Jacqueline O’Neill

Jacqueline O’Neill

Jacqueline O’Neill

President | Inclusive Security

Jacqueline O’Neill is the President of Inclusive Security, a DC-based organization that increases the inclusion of women in peace and security processes around the world. With partners in government and civil society, she has worked directly with more than 30 countries to create or improve government-wide strategies on inclusion. For nearly 15 years, Ms. O’Neill has trained and advised military, police, and civilians serving at NATO, the UN, the US Department of Defense, and beyond. She’s also directly supported coalitions of women leaders in Sudan, South Sudan, Pakistan, and beyond. Ms. O’Neill has testified to both US and Canadian Senate and House Committees. She is a frequent commentator in print and broadcast media having authored and edited numerous publications. She has been published by outlets including Foreign Policy, Vox, and the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations. Ms. O’Neill is on the board of the Canadian International Council and the Agenda Committee of the Halifax International Security Forum.

Before joining the organization in 2006, Ms. O’Neill was concurrently at the UN peacekeeping mission in Sudan (UNMIS) and at Khartoum’s Afhad University for Women. Previously, she was a policy adviser to Canada’s Secretary of State for the Asia-Pacific region. Along with former Lt. General Roméo Dallaire, she helped found an initiative to eliminate the use of child soldiers. She has a bachelor’s degree in commerce from the University of Alberta and a master’s in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.


READ

Nine Things You Need to Know About the Women, Peace, and Security Act
The Women, Peace, and Security Act on the Brink of Becoming Law
Colombia’s Inclusive Peace Deal is at Risk
7 Rules for Avoiding All-Male Panels
VIDEO: “How Female FARC Fighters Could Be The Key To Peace In Colombia”
Are Women the Key to Peace in Colombia?
Why Women?
VIDEO: “A More Inclusive Future for South Sudan
VIDEO: “Twenty Toward Inclusion”
We Need to Think Harder About Terrorism and Gender. Isis Already Is.